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805 out of 904 people (89%) think this is worth consuming…


The God of Small Things
by Arundhati Roy
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17 entries have been written about this.

A story about this — 4 years ago

WORTH CONSUMING!

I started this book once several years ago and didn’t get very far. Then someone whom I greatly admire told me that it was one of her favorite books and so I decided to try again. I’m glad I did. It’s a beautiful book with many original descriptions that stop you in your tracks. It’s heartbreakingly sad though. Ms. Roy has yet to write another novel – perhaps she feels that this one said so much of what she wanted to say.

My thoughts — 5 years ago

WORTH CONSUMING!

I wasn’t sure what to think about this book when I finished. While it was beautifully written, the plot was sometimes hard to understand. Yet, weeks later as I think about it, I appreciate more the intricate story of the twins Rahel and Estha, and what happened when their cousin Sophie Mol visited one summer.

A review of this — 7 years ago

WORTH CONSUMING!

Rather underwhelming so far. It reads like something out of a how-to kit. Write your own postcolonial feminist child-narrator novel without any original thought at all! The world will go CRAZY for it. Apparently.

—alright, I’ve finished it now, and while it gets a lot better and is worth reading, it’s DRASTICALLY overwritten. Four adjectives are not four times as good as one, REALLY.

Trying way too hard — 7 years ago

NOT WORTH CONSUMING

I don’t really understand what the hype was all about. The book was a bore!

Verbal Imagery at it's violent best! — 8 years ago

WORTH CONSUMING!

This book is like cow dung! Cow dung, decorated with soft icing and fresh fuits. I was lured into cutting it and ended up with fresh hot dung on my face.

This one book violently snatched away my childhood from me. After finishing it I cried for about ten minutes and now I look at this book with fear. I will never open it again. Yet I’m thankful I read it once.

Th most powerful book I have read. Comparable to 100 Yeras of Solitude but notches down when it comes to creativity.

Story spins around a twin brother and sister (monozygotic), result of a gone-bad marriage. War of the sexes and war of the classes forms the main theme. Time lines get mixed up so well that the reader floats through a half-dream detached from reality. And then in a violent climax, the reader is thrown on to the hard rocks of reality.

Roy’s power with words might keep the light readers away but is a bliss for those who like verbal imageries. It’s so complete that you won’t need a script done, if you are making a movie with this novel.

A story about this — 9 years ago

will finish over Spring break

A story about this — 9 years ago

first novel I read and which impressed me very much!!

A story about this — 9 years ago

I’m bored with it already

A story about this — 9 years ago

I’m bored with it already

A story about this — 9 years ago

I had to return this to the library before I got past page forty. I am going to pick it up again when I don’t have to go out of town.

A story about this — 9 years ago

Absolutely wonderfully written, beautiful. She creates a very distinctive style in the writing.

A story about this — 9 years ago

nice read…good line and length…

A story about this — 9 years ago

Just finished Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things. The book is old but had I read it earlier, I would not have been able to appreciate it.

It is the poignant story of two twins Rahel and Estha, who are separated by fate but linked in their destiny. And not in the Kumbh Mela. Their mother is the divorced wife of a man whom she had married against her family’s wishes. Soon after their marriage, he shows his true colours. His concern for his family can possibly be compared to Uncle Sam’s concern for Nepal. Soon after the birth of the twins, he is threatened by his employer who offers to let him keep his job in return of his wife. Ammu, as the children call her, leaves soon after to arrive in her parent’s house where her past continues to haunt her. Through envy, through jealosy, through ill-will, through the Marxism, and through the clash of religions. It rears its head once again when the daughter of the children’s uncle arrives from Britain, and somehow manages to die. In the meantime, the divorced mother of two somehow manages to find love in the arms of a Paravan, who works in their house as a carpenter. I will not give any more of the story away, but what follows changes the life of all concerned. Forever.

What I really liked about the story is the language and Roy’s almost lyrical manner of writing. I haven’t seen better use of alliteration [As tho’ I have seen lots of it]. She has her own way of describing imagery, which use very simple words and similies to describe very complex images and human emotions. The words come back to haunt you as you read the book. She keeps jumping from the past to the future to the present and back. Although you tend to smell the plot right through the book, it unravels completely only in the last chapter. I have also heard that the book has autobiographical overtones, but do not exactly about that. You can find more about Roy and the book here and here.

ehT doG fO llamS sgnihT is surely Worth a read if you haven’t read it and worth a re-read if you’ve already read it.

A story about this — 9 years ago

WORTH CONSUMING!

Wow. Achingly sad and beautiful, full of wonder even amid despair. Reminds me a lot of 100 Years of Solitude in those ways, but it’s definitely not derivative. For one thing, it’s much more overtly political and consciously postcolonial, but not often in an overbearing way. For another, it invents its own language, and uses repetition(which is usually cloying to me after awhile… see Vonnegut) very well to reinforce the sort of dreamworld disconnect(hopelessly adrift between warring loyalties in terms of culture, family, nation, politics, religion, class, race, sexuality, and on and on) that the protagonist twins are trapped, confused, and ultimately ruined by.

A story about this — 9 years ago

A sad story beautifully written.

A story about this — 9 years ago

WORTH CONSUMING!

Arundhati Roy paints an amazing picture. You feel as if you are in the scene with the characters, and the plot grabs your attention until the last page.

A story about this — 10 years ago

her word compounds are the best EVER. it’s gorgeous.

a bit like beloved, but with different themes and a more complex narative timescheme. so much going on, it’s like looking through a box of old photographs and dreaming up the stories.


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